Why is gravity an illusion?

August 26, 2010 § Leave a comment

Erik Verlinde, Theoretical Physicist at Amsterdam

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Erik Verlinde The theoretical physicist believes that gravity is an emergent phenomenon, not the elemental “force” that Newton and Einstein theorized it to be. He thinks it is the result of patterns of complex, microscopic phenomena.

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Energy Is Conserved (the history) (via viXra log)

August 11, 2010 § 1 Comment

Whether you agree with him or not, this is great time-line in the history of physics.  Philip Gibbs is fast becoming one of my favorite physics bloggers. Not because of his opinions, (I have no idea who’s opinion to believe.)but because of the detail of his explanations. I guess what I am saying is, he describes physics at a level I understand. He doesn’t write in technical jargon that only physicists can understand. And, he doesn’t dumb it down for the masses like… a couple of other guys I just decided not to name. (Because I like and respect them) 

“We have been discussion the law of conservation of energy in the context of classical general relativity. So far I have not been able to convince anyone here that the maths shows that energy is conserved. Lubos Motl and Matti Pitkanen have posted some contrary arguments on their blogs to add to the old one by Sean Carroll. We have also been trading points and counterpoint in the comments with Ervin Goldfain joining in, also in disagreement with m … Read More

via viXra log By Philip Gibbs

Welcome to The Carnal Carnival!

August 11, 2010 § 1 Comment

 The Carnal Carnival appealing to your more sophomoric interests since 2010 (it's science, we promise!)Who ever said scientists had no sense of humor, never met these guys. What, from my point of view as a casual twitter observer, began as a joke on twitter a few days ago has turned into a full-blown blog with articles scheduled out through October 2011 so far. Themes include: poop, barf, orgasm, and weird animal sex just to name a few. These are my kind of people. The tag line for  the blog is:

appealing to your more sophomoric interests since 2010 (it’s science, we promise!)

“The Carnal Carnival will publish the third Friday of each month. The host will pick the general topic for that particular month.”

via Welcome to The Carnal Carnival! «. <<Click Here

The Carnal Carnival is also on twitter.com

Reinforcements ordered in the war on brains

August 10, 2010 § 3 Comments

I am not a regular viewer of Rachel Maddow, but thanks to @darwinsbulldog I saw this and had to share it.

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Hubble Bubble

August 2, 2010 § Leave a comment

Every where I look I see bubbles. Ok, I know I see them because I am looking for them. I know the psychology. But, it is still fun and fascinating in many cases such as the Hubble Bubble.

“The Copernican principle holds that humans are not privileged observers of the Universe. Copernicus stated that the Earth is not at the center of the solar system or at any particularly special position in the heavens. Modern cosmology has extended this idea to reason that the earth does not occupy any unique position in the Universe. Modern philosophy of science pushes the principle even further to conclude that every observer (even if they be they little green men) should reason as if they were the most standard observer. However, despite all these humble and rational thoughts it is still tempting to explain certain aspects of modern cosmology that seem finely tuned as consequences of observer selection effects. Namely I am speaking of dark energy or the accelerated cosmological expansion which supposedly could be explained if we occupy a privileged position near the center of a large, nonlinear, and nearly spherical void in mass density. The idea that the region of the cosmos around us could be a void is colloquially known in astronomy as the Hubble bubble.” Read full article please

via The Astronomist: Hubble Bubble.

When will people understand?

July 28, 2010 § Leave a comment

The truth is so simple and yet so complex we are all connected. When it comes to the Oceans I just said it on July 28th. What happens in the oceans effects every living organism on the planet. How many times do I have to say that? It doesn’t matter how many times I say it. No one is listening to me. However, great people have been saying it for centuries, probably even eons.  John Delaney of Interactive Oceans said it again at TED. Please watch this amazing TED talk about the new technologies wiring an interactive ocean.

Turbulent the sea
Stretching across to  Sado
The Milky Way
-Basho 1689

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
Through the unknown, unremembered gate
When the last of earth left to discover
Is that which was the beginning;
At the source of the longest river
The voice of the hidden waterfall
And the children in the apple-tree
Not known, because not looked for
But heard, half-heard, in the stillness
Between two waves of the sea.
Quick now, here, now, always—
A condition of complete simplicity
(Costing not less than everything)
And all shall be well and
All manner of thing shall be well
When the tongues of flame are in-folded
Into the crowned knot of fire
And the fire and the rose are one.
-T. S. Eliot

Schedule for LHC’s next few years revealed

July 26, 2010 § Leave a comment

The race is on, or continuing between the LHC and the Tevatron.  Regular readers know of my passion for particle physics. I find the work they are doing at the accelerators endlessly fascinating. Will they find this Higgs? Personally I don’t think so. Can I back that up with a reasoned argument? Nope. But, there are some very brilliant theoretical physicists who can. My point, I don’t have a horse in this race. I am watching it for the beauty of the game. It is beautiful.

“Steve Myers, CERN’s Director for Accelerators and Technology, presented the LHC schedule for the next 10 years today in the first plenary presentation at the International Conference on High Energy Physics. Myers also presented his predictions for the amount of data that the LHC may collect over the same time period. These predictions over the next few years will be scrutinized closely by scientists at Fermilab’s Tevatron, who have proposed extending the accelerator’s life for a further 3 years.” Read full Story»

via symmetry breaking » Blog Archive » Schedule for LHC’s next few years revealed.

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